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Amber Rudd MP
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A Major Milestone

Today was a major milestone for Britain.

New figures show the economy is now above its pre-crisis peak.

Labour’s Great Recession shrank the economy by 7.2 per cent and cost Britain six years.

But the Conservatives’ long-term economic plan is getting Britain back on track and the IMF say our economy is now growing faster than any major advanced economy.

A growing economy means businesses creating jobs so more people have the financial security of a pay packet to provide for themselves and their families.

Thank goodness we didn’t listen to Ed Balls.

Only last year Labour’s Shadow Chancellor said our plan ‘is not working’ and we ‘should have U-turned on the plan’ (BBC News, 20 March 2013).

It’s yet another thing Labour have got wrong. They wrecked the economy when they were in government; said the recovery would never happen; and now have no plan besides more spending, more taxes and more debt than future generations can ever hope to pay off.

We owe it to hardworking taxpayers to keep working through our long-term economic plan and not repeat the mistakes of the past.

That’s the only way we’ll secure a stronger, healthier economy, and a better future for Britain.

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Labour haven’t learnt their lesson on welfare

Labour’s out-of-control welfare system created a culture of dependency which promoted welfare at the expense of work.

Under their system, some people were claiming £104,000 a year of hardworking taxpayers’ money in housing benefit to live in expensive areas.

Since we came into office, we’ve been building a welfare system that provides a safety net for those in need, while rewarding those who want to work hard and get on in life.

We’ve capped benefits so no family can claim more than the average family gets by going out to work and we’ve put an end to unlimited housing benefit.

But Labour haven’t learnt their lesson.

They voted against our housing benefit cap, they voted against our overall cap on benefits and they still plan to borrow and spend more by restoring the spare room subsidy – landing future generations with more debt than they can ever hope to repay.